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set
  • 31054.2204

  • 31036.2252

  • 31033.2309

    Somewhere between Fleischer and Plympton is Bozzetto, whose 1976 satire of Fantasia sliced up animation's tropes and let loose. Rarely screened in revival. Many tangents in Allegro's animation, like other innovations of the 70's, were discarded by the mainstream.  A must see. Here's Sibelius's Valse Triste, where an anti-Aristocat makes wall art while exploring the edge's of Bozzetto's momentary genius.

  • 31027.2144

    Jerome Agel, Buckminster Fuller, McLuhan, Fiore, Herman Kahn, and assorted other characters reinvent the book as the message paperback of the 60s and it sells for $2.45. While McLuhan and Fuller enjoyed long-lasting notoriety (their paperbacks were merely the mass-marketing side of their fame), unsung hero Jerome Agel created some of the most inventive new journalism as portable rapid fire non-fiction. His Signet original The Making of Kubrick's 2001 included photocopies of torn tickets stubs demanding refunds, complaints by scientist Freeman Dyson about the acting, as well as a study of the initial rejection days after the film's release by established critics. Most reviews are full length. The critical shellacing chapter is followed by one of re-reviews, sudden reversals of critics, a few merely days after their first drubbing. And then, in the chapter "The Good Stuff," came John Lennon's famous claim on WBAI, that he sees it every week at the Loews, and suddenly the tide had turned. Space Odyssey shifted from failed mainstream property to the youth cult charm of the summer of love. The book shadows esoteric data with camera printing reports and detailed imagery that reveal effects secrets. The book came with a bravura 96 page centerpiece of images.

    This book from Princeton Architectural Press compiles their various pulp-visual styles and edits them into a sharp documentary paperback, the first of its kind. The first of its size. (including selections from McLuhan, Fuller, Herman Kahnciousness, The Making of 2001). Unironically priced: $19.95

  • 31026.1913

    This scant black and white masterpiece photo book, like another black and white photobook Wisconsin Death Trip, is composed of entirely found negatives, culled from historical, industrial and governmental archives (the defense industry is well in evidence). Evidence, made of some of the greatest late 20th century images of American photography, is precisely how future anthropologists will assess our near past. Specifically it will act as an introductory map to our various archives of visual data which will acompany very complex factual data, from a time/era without very much filming/taping ability. Each image the tip of an iceberg of thousands upon thousands of negatives. Services might even rebuild motion events from a series or even a single still of an experiment, and discover what really went wrong. Documentary movies will probably be made from stills in the future, tracking algorithms can spot each speed of a street in motion's objects, render them for seven seconds. The blur has micro blurs in the negative. Evidence will come to life. First published in 1977 (the equally great Wisconsin Death Trip was published 1974). Reprinted recently.

     

  • 31010.1402

    The study of "emotion" in radically non-Western communities - the kind of places in which anthropologists have traditionally worked - throws light both on the nature and functions of emotion (and of the individual emotions) and on the relations of individuals in those places to the historically transmitted ambient forms that constitute their "culture." As the temptation to put the two key terms ("emotion" and "culture") within quotation marks suggest, both terms are problematic, and we will encounter some of the confusions of Alice's croquet game, with both mallets and balls, not to mention wickets, in eccentric motion.

    - from Culture Theory: Essays on Mind, Self and Emotion edited by Richard A. Schweder

  • 3109.0619

    Made as the radical underground began organizing into violent factions, Peter Watkins's Punishment Park is a window into late 60's extremism. Portrayed as a documentary, this fictional window into law-enforcement and justice showcases a brilliantly realized manhunt through desert terrain, with convicted extremists forced to run literally for their lives towards a 58 mile distant flag to escape sentences of up to 21 years for sedition. The deal is quite simple, make it to the flag and your sentence will be vacated. Told explicitly, with some threads well developed, others staccato (as if the crews lost their subjects), the film begins with the convicts' arrival at a makeshift court clearly outside the bounds of constitutional law, with a council of judges made up hastily from the locale status quo (California). A lone civil rights lawyer tries to add balance to the proceedings but is little more than a gnat in the face of a slowly moving elephant. It bears some resemblance to our current fears, the desert locale has an eerie nuance and the procedures seem to predict Guantanamo. Unknown actors provide pivotal performances. A cold satire of both sides. An early demonstration of hunting techniques by a policeman must be seen.

  • 311360.1447

  • 311345.0800

    As the Indian Wars dialed down in the late 1800's, eastern institutions sent ethnographers to study the fallen first Americans. Alfred Kroeber, one of the early pioneers was sent to study the Southern Arapaho in the then Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), then visited the Northern Arapaho in Wyoming finally the similar Gros Ventre in Montana. His studies were published first, like most academics then, in four separate volumes of the Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History. Kroeber's study is a masterwork and is copiously illustrated.

    These two groupings at bottom: 1) Game pieces for a memory game similar to Concentration. 2) Paint pouches.

  • 311339.0848

    Unlike Karl Mannheim, who saw ideology through a generalized lens, Bruehl viewed ideoloy as a window into archetypes, neurosis and personality; in effect, she saw the breaking down of racism/sexism/ethnicism as a struggle for psychonanlysis to bear. More 20th century front-loading, but still an involving read. There are fairy-tale abstractions in Bruehl's approach to psychonanlysis.