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physic
  • 311271.2144

  • 311257.1435

    Zenon Pylyshyn, Cognitive Scientist, who's discovered rotational aspects of the cortex's way of 'seeing' perhaps even how memories are anchored.

    Why is this important? It may be a key to building the first conscious language, which may in-turn unlock the brain's full capabilities.

    See: Seeing and Visualizing, It's Not What You Think. Winner, Best ABA Scholarly Book, 2003

    Below: Gobors have dual rotational lines, column a are snapshots every 250ms. They illustrate human 'objectification' in motion and space.

    Some think 300ms is the human 'shutter' rate.

     

  • 311245.1034

  • 311238.1237

    Jackie Sparnackel abandons her van and belongings near the Frisco Pier after driving up to see how the storm-battered structure was doing Saturday. Friends tried to tow her out but she was caught in an overwash. Hurricane force winds from Irene were battering the island where power has been knocked out. (Notice her left hand: she grabbed her meds)

  • 311220.1844

    Oil is now sent out of Turkey, bypassing the Caspian and the Russians.

    Turkey beats it to the market by gaining direct access to the eastern Mediterranean.

  • 311184.1025

     

    "We see...what experimental facts lead us to ascribe three dimensions to space. As a consequence of these facts, it would be more convenient to attribute three dimensions to it rather than four or two, but the term convenient is perhaps not strong enough; a being which had attributed two or four dimensions to space would be handicapped in a world like ours in the struggle for existence." H. Poincaré

    Barrow and Tipler's 1988 book is a groundbreaking summary of biology, physics and geology, all wrapped up in a semi-tidy box. Posing the thesis that consciousness (Anthropic) is a facet of the cosmos (Cosmological) that, in reverse, can explain the overall principle inherent in its physical make-up, their goals are to unify theory around pivots in ratios and numbers, big ticket items, that lead somewhat to a conclusion that dimensions and time-scales operate with valences of one another. It's the book you hand to someone who claims a universe is inside their fingernail. Although deeply western (their first chapters list no comprehension of eastern thinking or myths of time and scale), the book is meant to universally explore the human nature of cosmology. Be warned, Tipler's later work without Barrow enters crackpot territory as he unifies Christianity and physics with bizarre, self-centered results (he excludes other religious myths as well as hints he believes in intelligent design).  Tipler's other disconnect whopper is his insistence we are the sole vessels of conscious life in the galaxy, so be wary. Although heavily built on equations, the book explains its progressive use of them carefully so that non math thinkers can extrapolate as well. Quotes are astonishing. Illustrations as well. First published in the aftermath of the PC revolution: 1986.

  • 311165.1216

    Completely stunning. The thin line is Saturn's ring shot dead-on.

    CASSINI MISSION from Chris Abbas on Vimeo.

  • 311164.0754

    From The Economist, Hydrogen antimatter now can be stored, observed and then destroyed to examine the remains. The video attached to the article is essential.

  • 311154.1030
    In the lumbering dark age of film (1982 - ?), few films managed to capture the zeitgeist of its local era by looking backwards better than Donnie Darko (consider the compression in Blue Velvet, a then present-day eighties resembling the fifties). Darko portals a tough audience during Halloween 2001 with North America at its unconscious peak 1988.  New wave music flooded teenpocalypse Donnie managed to teleport brooding audiences back to 1988 with a mixture of vernacular and desire (anybody remember Star Search?). Rip-roaring through Reagan aftermath teenage angst, Kelly throws us bullies, cellar doors, Halloween, bunnies, vandalism, psychotherapy, self-help, portals, Smurf theory (begun in costume: notice the pizza dinner's outfits on the kids - they're Smurfs), second-stage Stephen King and a collage of 80's existential blockbusterisms: E.T. through The Abyss. Even strange little details like the chyron "Recorded Earlier" on the Presidential debates offer compass heading to the procedings. The detail pile-on is infectious and pretty carefully woven. Unlike Linklater's anthropological-sociological overnight Dazed and Confused, Kelly knows how to organize references through visual overlapping. Skeletized with metaphorical parallelism, Donnie's key stroke is to hide its time-travel as a function of cinematic convention. Many, many pages have been spent uncovering Donnie's details (here is Dan Kois's attempt Everything You Wanted To Ask About Donnie Darko But Were Afraid To Ask), but these inquiries look only at the nouns, the liminal pieces, none go into the metaphysical suggestion that gives the film its stand-alone gravity. At the film's release, somatic thinkers like Elvis Mitchell misperceived Kelly explicitly - he read it as Hughes (John) meets Marquez (Gabriel Garcia), but the chaos in metaphors of nature and body isn't the thing, the metaphors are optic.  Donnie isn't merely an eighties retro fable, it's about a specific type of travel. What gives Donnie's portals their meaning, their substance, is their direct relationship with celluloid's continuous time-travel. The film is a time-portal for every audience member, the way Donnie uses his to navigate fate for 28 days. Kelly makes this clear by showing us three scenes inexorably linked, the bathroom scenes and the movie theater scene. In the bathroom scenes, Frank stands behind, or within a clear, film-like surface that wobbles as Donnie touches it, and bleeds light when Donnie stabs it (the metaphor gets its reality dose: the light that screams from Frank's eye is the projector's bulb). Get it? Donnies somehow awakened inside a film, trying to stab his way out; he might be cinema's first character conceived to be semi-conscious inside celluloid (outside of Bugs's, Mickey's, Daffy's and all animation radical fourth wall breaking). To counterpoint the bathroom lesson is the Aero movie theater scene (its name goes with the fallen plane engine), which stars Frank as well, and involves Donnie's second lesson in time-travel displayed on a movie screen that portals. Now instead of standing on other sides of the celluloid, they face it, proving Kelly animates, or progresses his metaphors. The double-feature even has a subtle aside using Scorsese's martyr-opus, Last Temptation of Christ as a second feature, unseen. That film ends with a rising son blitzed into a light show that can only be considered celluloid abstraction (it's pure analog optic). Scorsese blends his Jesus with light just as Kelly does, only Kelly makes him aware of his dimension. His prison. And his release into light: he's laughing not suffering. He gets the joke. Once you really put the two films in the double-feature together, or spot what the engine goes through before it gobbles Donnie (or a million other clues), you see what Kelly's getting at.

     

    Gretchen replaces the film screen between Donnie and Frank.

  • 311151.0827

    During a training exercise, Apache helicopters aim their gun's cameras at a splintering Columbia.

    The final three objects hitting the ground are the shuttle's engines.