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instinct
  • 313140.0815

  • 313127.0909

  • 313124.0901

    A Star Wars 'prequel' incorporating forms that will evolve into a Watergate era Blockbuster.

  • 313110.1024

  • 313108.1338

    aside from using sci-fi or crime genres as vessels, these are still 18th, 19th and 20th century narrative archetypes/forms masquerading as our future.

  • 313104.2120

  • 313103.0724

    Disney Expert Uses Science to Draw Boy Viewers

    LOS ANGELES — Kelly Peña, or “the kid whisperer,” as some Hollywood producers call her, was digging through a 12-year-old boy’s dresser drawer here on a recent afternoon. Her undercover mission: to unearth what makes him tick and use the findings to help the Walt Disney Company reassert itself as a cultural force among boys.

    Ms. Peña, a Disney researcher with a background in the casino industry, zeroed in on a ratty rock ’n’ roll T-shirt. Black Sabbath?

    “Wearing it makes me feel like I’m going to an R-rated movie,” said Dean, a shy redhead whose parents asked that he be identified only by first name.

    Jackpot.

    Ms. Peña and her team of anthropologists have spent 18 months peering inside the heads of incommunicative boys in search of just that kind of psychological nugget. Disney is relying on her insights to create new entertainment for boys 6 to 14, a group that Disney used to own way back in the days of “Davy Crockett” but that has wandered in the age of more girl-friendly Disney fare like “Hannah Montana.”

    Children can already see the results of Ms. Peña’s scrutiny on Disney XD, a new cable channel and Web site (disney.go.com/disneyxd). It’s no accident, for instance, that the central character on “Aaron Stone” is a mediocre basketball player. Ms. Peña, 45, told producers that boys identify with protagonists who try hard to grow. “Winning isn’t nearly as important to boys as Hollywood thinks,” she said.

    Actors have been instructed to tote their skateboards around with the bottoms facing outward. (Boys in real life carry them that way to display the personalization, Ms. Peña found.) The games portion of the Disney XD Web site now features prominent trophy cases. (It’s less about the level reached in the game and more about sharing small achievements, research showed.)

    Fearful of coming off as too manipulative, youth-centric media companies rarely discuss this kind of field research. Disney is so proud of its new “headquarters for boys,” however, that it has made an exception, offering a rare window onto the emotional hooks that are carefully embedded in children’s entertainment. The effort is as outsize as the potential payoff: boys 6 to 14 account for $50 billion in spending worldwide, according to market researchers.

    Thus far, Disney’s initiative is limited to the XD channel. But Disney hopes that XD will produce a hit show that can follow the “High School Musical” model from cable to merchandise to live theater to feature film, and perhaps even to Disney World attraction.

    With the exception of “Cars,” Disney — home to the “Princesses” merchandising line; the Jonas Brothers; and “Pixie Hollow,” a virtual world built around fairies — has been notably weak on hit entertainment franchises for boys. (“Pirates of the Caribbean” and “Toy Story” are in a type of hibernation, awaiting new big-screen installments.) Disney Channel’s audience is 40 percent male, but girls drive most of the related merchandising sales.

    Rivals like Nickelodeon and Cartoon Network have made inroads with boys by serving up rough-edged animated series like “The Fairly Oddparents” and “Star Wars: The Clone Wars.” Nickelodeon, in particular, scoffs at Disney’s recent push.

    “We wrote the book on all of this,” said Colleen Fahey Rush, executive vice president for research of MTV Networks, which includes Nickelodeon.

    Even so, media companies over all have struggled to figure out the boys’ entertainment market. News Corporation infamously bet big on boys in the late 1990s with its Fox Kids Network and a digital offering, Boyz Channel. Both failed and drew criticism for segregating the sexes (there was also a Girlz Channel) and reinforcing stereotypes.

    The guys are trickier to pin down for a host of reasons. They hop more quickly than their female counterparts from sporting activities to television to video games during leisure time. They can also be harder to understand: the cliché that girls are more willing to chitchat about their feelings is often true.

    The people on Ms. Peña’s team have anthropology and psychology backgrounds, but she majored in journalism and never saw herself working with children. Indeed, her training in consumer research came from working for a hotel operator of riverboat casinos.

    “Children seemed to open up to me,” said Ms. Peña, who does not have any of her own.

    Sometimes the research is conducted in groups; sometimes it involves Ms. Peña’s going shopping with a teenage boy and his mother (and perhaps a videographer). The subjects, who are randomly selected by a market research company, are never told that Disney is the one studying them. The children are paid $75.

    Walking through Dean’s house in this leafy Los Angeles suburb on the back side of the Hollywood Hills, Ms. Peña looked for unspoken clues about his likes and dislikes.

    “What’s on the back of shelves that he hasn’t quite gotten rid of — that will be telling,” she said beforehand. “What’s on his walls? How does he interact with his siblings?”

    One big takeaway from the two-hour visit: although Dean was trying to sound grown-up and nonchalant in his answers, he still had a lot of little kid in him. He had dinosaur sheets and stuffed animals at the bottom of his bed.

    “I think he’s trying to push a lot of boundaries for the first time,” Ms. Peña said later.

    This kind of intensive research has paid dividends for Disney before. Anne Sweeney, president of the Disney ABC Television Group, noted it in her approach to rebuilding Disney Channel a decade ago.

    “You have to start with the kids themselves,” she said. “Ratings show what boys are watching today, but they don’t tell you what is missing in the marketplace.”

    While Disney XD is aimed at boys and their fathers, it is also intended to include girls. “The days of the Honeycomb Hideout, where girls can’t come in, have long passed,” said Rich Ross, president of Disney Channels Worldwide.

    In Ms. Peña’s research boys across markets and cultures described the television aimed at them as “purposeless fun” but expressed a strong desire for a new channel that was “fun with a purpose,” Mr. Ross said. Hollywood has been thinking of them too narrowly — offering all action or all animation — instead of a more nuanced combination, he added. So far results have been mixed.

    Disney XD, which took over the struggling Toon Disney channel, has improved its predecessor’s prime-time audience by 27 percent among children 6 to 14, according to Nielsen Media Research. But the bulk of this increase has come from girls. Viewership among boys 6 to 14 is up about 10 percent.

    “We’ve seen cultural resonance, and it doesn’t come overnight,” Mr. Ross said.

    Which is one reason Ms. Peña is still out interviewing. At Dean’s house her team was quizzing him about what he meant when he used the word “crash.” Ben, a 12-year-old friend who had come over to hang out, responded, “After a long day of doing nothing, we do nothing.”

    Growing self-conscious, Ben added, “Am I talking too much?”

    Not even close.

  • 313100.1414

  • 31386.0001

  • 31384.0820

     

    The Boulder bathroom. Storytelling through tracking continues. Danny's childhood, as Disney/Warner Bros/Peanuts image-glyphs suggest, is being left behind, moving past the left side of the screen, as the island in the opening shot does; this mimicry links both lake and bathroom reflective surfaces, defining and evolving our notion of mirroring and passages. Besides being a deft play on words (left-behind), the movement, sidedness, and multiple mirrors (implied or actual) indicate Kubrick has a passing knowledge of neuroscience. His notion of dualism, like the brain's, is visual. Danny's ritual passage into adulthood is coming rapidly on the right inside the mirror where his father is to be slain by him and the hotel. The left wall exhibits a sliding show of children's mythology and animal life recalling the preceding, offscreen Roadrunner animation. Mickey Mouse will later appear on Danny’s sweater, another mischievous hero; Kubrick identifies Danny with troublemaking seers from all canons of animation, a contrast to Wendy's novel/text world, Danny consumes and identifies with animated visual mythologies. Unlike his parents he has no books in his room: without reading skills, he has no dual, or lexemic (mutliple) or metonymic meanings in his brain's language centers, a freedom the adults do not enjoy nor do they even perceive this advantage.

    By using Tony as a reflection of himself, Danny appears consciously dual; his double works as a tool, it-he prevents Danny from being swallowed into The Overlook's mirrors. And in contrast to the film's terminus bound storytelling (ending in 1921), Kubrick contrasts the lifeless B&W still (appearing in both the last shot and the last shot of the film) with Woodstock's rainbow in-motion. The spectral-light of Ullman's office (a Shining) dissolves from Jack's forehead to the bathroom's sunlight, he is dissolved to an approaching room with a central light source framed precisely like Ullman's office, a travelling reversal of our shot of Jack. The Boulder apartment's actual sunlight is subtly contrasted/transitioned with the Hotel's false window's pure white light, a light-value (white balance) in reverse of the previous. Doubling seen in background of previous Boulder shots and the nightmare doubling of the hotel beginning with Bill Watson extends metaphorically to these cartoon figures: doubling through anthropomorphism - spirits entering bodies. The textless myths affixed to Danny's wall will be used to slay/fool his father. He inhabits these archetypes variably. Second clearly visible mirror of film (the lake is the first), the bathroom's, is man-made and now vertical. Danny is speaking into it, he treats it like a two-way medium. The mirror is an unseen animation from the view Danny had into the TV's cartoon, this shot separates the animated characters left (the past in numerous temporal paths). It's like storing them in your memory. It allows an evolution in seeing, from TV to mirror, Danny peers into the mirror and sees beyond the TV's metaphors, to the 'future' of the film. The medium he sees is as photorealistic as reality. Danny uses the TV's animated, mythic archetypes as guides from nature that transform into physical archetypes. He is the eagle that followed his father during the credits. His overlook much more powerful than his father. Danny then goes a step further, passive reception of the hotel's transmission. Does Tony travel to these events, or does the hotel send its warning? Later Danny will contact Halloran through a TV, hitching his signal to the newscast.  Danny’s abilities are supernaturally conscious - 'now' time travelling, both the bleeding elevator (which is witnessed by Wendy at film's end) and the girls (he later witnesses them from his tricycle) are future events actively sent to him as physical realities; he predicts Wendy's coming call seconds later. Once isolated in the mirror, we see Danny stands in a pink-tiled, red bordered room that cuts directly to the elevator's red mask.

    We pan right from the kitchen to the living room as Wendy completes the milk's reverse journey from glass to carton to refrigerator. In this shot we see Wendy with all current consumer telecommunication devices, TV & Phone.  Media (books, TV and wall imagery) form an arrow-tree shape pointing upwards. This is the opposite view of the Boulder apartment establishing shot we witnessed at the dining table, this is a cross/reverse-angled composition of where Danny stares at in the first shot: while the TV plays Roadrunner. The film is an escalating series of visions, the hotel is accessed through TV's and mirrors and now he is staring from the bathroom mirror 'into' the TV: he predicts the call.  Look at the call's intercutting closely, she picks up a white phone, and in its same position in the next shot is a woman walking in all white who passes into a glint of sunlight reflection, framed to contrast the TV with its live-action western, an animation into realism from the Roadrunner cartoon, a transition from children's entertainment to adult-themed conflict, both TV show are wild west.  Later Danny will watch an adult themed film below a TV surrounded by toys wearing a Mickey Mouse sweater. He'll then walk to a conversation with his father who acts like a cartoon villain. The TV is the active portal. The TV's effects are diminished intentionally in this house, it's surrounded by books, telling us the adults find their alphabetical information superior to the TV's. This TV reappears in Halloran's house with a reversed framing. All hanging art is relevant, here they provide contradictions, Boulder apartment's Japanese print and TV screen are framed in precise verticals with Hotel lobby's columns, their intercutting becomes key. What they mean: the Boulder's print is of nature, sharpened, the nature seen outside the Lobby is ghosted: supernatural and they mirror one another. It coyly hints once you enter the Hotel, nature is no longer powerful, the supernatural is dominant, beyond our conception of biology. The TV's cowboys in their cathode blue contrasts the reddened column it cuts to, a spot with the highest shine, and they directly mimic Bill Watson and Ullman's pose. Our first clue the entire hotel's vision is merely conjured, yet in a medium far more complex than television. Notice the employees all contact the clay colored columns, along with Jack. Shot reveals Jack at phone, a 45 degree mirror exhibits Ullman and Bill Watson in similar, mirrored conversational positions to Jack. A man in the lobby's far background regards the maze model in the opposite position to Jack's stance above it later. The TV used to portal Summer of '42 later in the film is shown in background, inert. The bellhop that stands at the near column is carefully patterned, his colors flow from the pattern he stands above, even his foot stance is continued below. Wendy and women-at-desk are similarly dressed like settlers: a derogatory suggestion about gender roles. Image contrast is high at home and low at hotel (it is shining).



    The column behind Jack, and its inverse, the inset framing him in the office interview, are both the width size of Danny’s bathroom mirror as his zoom above begins, a compression of meanings.  The mirror's door is not closed, it is slightly opened on its left side.  A doorway in editing. This ajar/folding space motif is employed continuously in the film; variations of this logic, spaces and rooms that have folds and doorways that are left open, are also continuous, a visual play on words. Vertical interview. Some cuts invert background and subject.  Others are bookend transitions, like an image of Danny looking, appearing to see what lurks in the next shot (seeing what we see). Patterns made of folded walls in backgrounds, irregular wall designs, impossibly overlapping spaces, all begin to emerge slowly as animations across cuts. Kubrick may have adapted this frozen animation style from his own manner merged with ghost logic/graphic topiary scene in the novel: there each time Jack looks back at animals carved from shrubbery they've moved, in effect Kubrick makes the entire film this blink-and-the-scene-is-different, and he gets to avoid the topiary scene's pulpy narrative device, its visual effect's problematics. Importantly the topiary scene is a strictly a literary device - it's only perceivable by Jack, who turns to walk and loses sight of the hedges, Kubrick rigorously chooses to avoid King's devices and offer hallucinations that are continuously and communally viewable.

    This interview exhibits two faces: Danny's and the elevator's.

    Above, a series of interrelated forms. Notice the centering of the elevator's left call button, its embedded T-shape, and the urns's nose-like shape.

    East (ritual blood portals) meets West (elevators)

    This image has been cropped to frame one of the elevator's 'faces' made out of both lit call buttons and the skin-toned urn's nose.

    The film's poster, a medium that descends from stelae and other publicly placed displays, illustrates what shining actually is, in yellow, animating the Starchild's/Danny's face from a black and white realm, or the final view as the child is frozen into the black and white realm the film ends with, a horrifying conceptual sunset. The elevator is a progression from/to this poster's title-image, the T of The (the Mayan 'ik) is transformed to the Mesoamerican (Aztec/Mayan/Mixtec/Zapotec) lintel form, a staging location associated with rulership rituals that included bloodletting (warfare, rulership acension, and priesthood were sometimes linked through blood spilling) and human sacrifice. Like the poster's T 'ik window subconsciously transforming into the elevator's T-shaped lintel, Danny's/Starchild's eyes animate (in some respects they merge) into the elevator's dials. The poster's yellow (can be read as a literal version of k'an sunlight, see below) is diluted from the elevator's red and white, an implied color transition. Two black and white framed posters/photos of Indians on left and right walls act as mirrors. The chandelier is in full blast, an overexposed shining like the poster's overblown yellow light.

    Images from within: the demonic face of the hotel, the elevator, in a sunlight less corridor, ejects blood from its left side indicating the hotel is an intelligent entity conjuring corporeal hallucinations. Similar doorway/elevator masks are laced throughout the hotel. The blood pours earthward to mirror - mimic the water the film begins with, the furniture moves and floats not unlike the island's movement.  Examine the liquids consciously: Red (blood) White (milk) and Blue (lake). Gravity enforces the division made by the liquid/sky - it moves from upper to lower, red falls in contrast to the blue titles that rise. Watch further examples of right-left entrances. Red is isolated in this shot, spilling into a nearly duotone hallway. As an extraction blood-rite, the elevator's bleeding visually summarizes the extreme ritual of sacrifice and bloodletting. As a destiny-destination that separates body from spirit, the Hotel combines the transference of human sacrifice through a visual metaphor: a body dies, its 'spirit' is trapped. Obviously this blood refers to Jack's draining at the climax once you connect Wendy's view with the maze's simultaneous trap. The color, life concentrated into a liquid, is drawn from the living who, if doubled and killed inside the hotel/maze, become black and white as a final state (which is why the landscape images outside Ullman’s office can keep their color, there are no humans exhibited). Brilliantly, by surrounding an elevator bank with blood-red Native patterns, designers of the Ahwanee Hotel in 1927 seem to consciously or unconsciously refer to these temple-portals that led (like elevator's strict functionality) to alternate upper and lower realms. Stairless portals of the machine age.  Here it can be labeled a T-shaped Mesoamerican portal hybridized with North American Indian forms.  The lintel is used in platform portals that descend into the underworld, like most portals atop Mayan/Aztec/Mixtec/Zapotec/'Olmec'/Toltec pyramids, they represent a mythological doorway connecting spirit, blood and lower worlds. No other primary color appears.  Like Ullman's office, there is asymmetry within apparent symmetry. Flash cut, the girls appear as twins though they are not (we've been told they are different ages), an asymmetrical doubling meant to invite Danny, if unaware, to join and double himself (which has already begun to Jack). The Hotel is showing Danny a conjuring, a penetrating false-mirror, they are supernatural guides to the building's uses, like a loop in a videogame that warns us on several occasions what to avoid to survive while showing Danny a clue; a how-to guide to hotel's hidden mirrors. We stare at them laterally (our eyes remain on a horizon) but we interpret their differences in conscious and unconscious manners sideways, there are right-left differences of bilateral symmetry and asymmetry (ie: differences in body weight, ratios of torso/legs). Their shot has blue as a primary and yellow as secondary (the title sequence returns as color leitmotif contrasted against elevator's pure red and white). Their background is littered with asymmetries and complex shadowing as well as a left hallway (like the blood they too arrived from the left). Notice the precision of Kubrick, below, both elevator and girl's corridor share exactly matching left wall corners.  The hotel's animated power, hinted at by the T-form fronting the elevator, separates into further asymmetries, colors diffuse their purities into other patterns. Back to the elevator. Now red pours onto floor (and the red animates into the hotel: the kitchen's access way that Danny drives over, the walls of the Gold Ballroom’s bathroom, the fire alarm bells, the piping, the snocat...)

     



    The elevator (and its framing) is related to the outer/inner symmetries split into asymmetries in Ullman's office, in this framing there is both asymmetry and a centerpoint. A brilliant animation in cutting: look closely at the second image above, at the frame's dead center is the elevator's left call button, an incongruous and sly over design, why does an elevator bank require two request buttons. This is a direct portal with the murderous logic of 2001, combining color (the red of HAL's eye) and the form (the alit call-button) equates HAL 9000's eye-display with this elevator bank. Why? Kubrick equates them. Both are masks of murderous entities, and they are intelligences that discovered murder in revolt to the paradoxes they were created/conquered by. There are complex differences as well. The hotel's manifest intelligence is asymmetric and analog in contrast to HAL's framed symmetric, heuristic, digital identity (supernatural/supercomputer). They are opposites on one level and yet both are murderers. If the view facing Ullman at his desk and his false window is an illusory, complex portal to a perceived skylit ghosting-form (the lighting fixtures and the window) through an opening in native wave-lightning patterns (the curtains), decrypted for the audience by a visual shift (which reveals the asymmetry hiding behind symmetry), then the elevator bank's asymmetry is a progression from both office framings (HAL is a cyclops, the elevator bank is cockeyed: the way Kubrick frames it for us), a metamorphosis that combines in one shot what is seen in Ullman's office in alternate shots: a central mask.  HAL is born from perceptive and taught electrical logic (and collapses into a murderous rage, a fit of perfection) and the Hotel (with elevator button like HAL's seeing interface) is born from holocaust murder-death purified into spectral logic.



    Return to Boulder, red and blue (and white, her skin) are grouped back into Wendy’s outfit.

    Third redhead, the doctor, examines Danny by shining light into his eyes (and our last image was of a very faint point of light in the center of frame), who lies upon a brown bear pillow with the elevator's half circle eye form (protected like a native in his sleep/dreams by a spirit-bear). See the mirror both bear and doctor create. She also is dressed in brown hues, a fellow bear of the forest. Her final bodygarment is black suggesting a void, like the bear's mouth he could be swallowed up by and in motif similar to the animal illustration on the floor which duplicates every color in the room (and mimics monolith from 2001) and acts as a void. Appliques on left wall become three dimensional on right wall. Danny's eyes cross the center plane both horizontally and vertically (similar to the poster), as if he has seen beyond. The doctor mimics him in communication but does not succeed entirely ("is Tony one of your animals?"), she remains above horizon. When asked if Tony tells him to do things, he looks both left and right: he checks with both sides of himself - a sign of consciousness. He tells her he will not answer anymore questions. Danny disagrees with her request to remain in bed. A hero's defiance: he is suspicious of her motives. Wendy stares at bed from its foot, this exact stance 90 degree morphed is doubled at film’s end for a shock scene, the bear reappears at the film’s end reversed: as Wendy runs up the stairs, she spots a Bear giving head to a partygoer sitting on bed, her angle to the bed 90 degrees off this first bear. Danny sees the bleeding elevator before this bear, Wendy sees it after her bear. This tells us the hotel scares you with signs you are not aware of consciously: it reads your mind and later shows something you fear to you at right angles.

    The movement from bedroom to living room is a series of right angles. "Shall we go into the living room." No doubt conscious of language shifting, this moniker seems normal to us, but perverse to non-English users. Kubrick repeatedly shows us the normality of this apartment and it will contrast with the monstrous impossibilities of the Hotel's design (to be explained in detail later).



    Cigarette:  Doctor sits under sunlight and disappears into color void, like Ullman her hair matches the curtains, she is ghosted. Forms of curtains here are animating from Ullman's curtains: now a Navajo sunset pattern is used. Doctor's hand gestures differ when cutting, suggesting the Doctor is part of this mirror world that Wendy is not, she remains to one side of her unlike Jack. She's contrasted in both outfit and skintone/haircolor. Wendy takes out a cigarette (a reference to Navajo/Crow peace pipe) and is interviewed.  Her unconditional retelling of Danny’s accident means she does not rewrite history. The magic of the Navajo spirit in the smoke is honored (tobacco is a truth/peace drug). Although her past is not peaceful, she does not hide from it. This scene occurs in Altman’s 3 Women with very different palattes. Like Ullman, she refers to violence as "just one of those things."  The ‘Navajo’ pattern from the Ullman interview is here composed of books, it is centered and is the highest point in the frame in almost same spot as the office, except here it is perfectly centered horizontally. Notice the shift of window left from Ullman office while the zig-zag pattern remains centered and closed. The desk is no longer a seat of power, it is a communal coffee table. These interviews achieve subtle alterations in their meanings.



    Closing day is Halloween. Ullman explains earlier their season runs May 15 (very near film's release date) through October 30th. 

    The car drives on left slope of approach valley, a reverse of first approach.



    Framing of family in car allows Danny to be the tallest (and he remains visible to Jack in Bug's interior rear view mirror). He's subtly haloed, and is hungry, behavior more akin to the coyote than the roadrunner. Last Danny standing shot was looking into the bathroom's mirror right, now he looks left into another mirror now offscreen, the car's rearview mirror, and speaks into it. Jack glances at him in it repeatedly, in effect Danny is chasing him (the Roadrunner/Coyote reversed).  Notice audio, the car is almost silent, “Boy it sure feels different up here.”  Danny mentions he already knows about the cannibalistic Donner Party from "the television." This mirrors the opening scene, since Danny came along there as well. Here he follows inside the car.  One of the few shots composing the family together.  This is the only original piece of music composed for the film as the opening theme is the Dies Irae.



    The following shot is a reverse of the interior angle.



    Again hotel is shown as ghost ship, the dissolve maps the Beetle's arrival as a vision, see the Beetle appears on a road to itself curving, where it is parked. Different time of day/angle of sun/change in sky condition from opening.



    Reverse angle from initial lobby establishing shot (Jack’s initial arrival).  A mirror staged to re-enact his first interview, Jack is seated like he was in Ullman's office. Ullman is dressed in same colors as column. Like bellhop in previous scene in lobby, reversed.  Once out of red white and blue uniform, he adopts the hotel’s appearance. The dissolve(s) showcase patterns, surfaces and perspectives in play. In the distance, BOTH interiors have matching staircases, like a lock's form, look at the dissolve: the man with the rolled rug is ascending. Many facements overlap perfectly (notice photographs). Crosses dissolve into elevator door.



    Ullman and Jack depart left and arrive right. A red pool table links this room with Games room (the Games room has a Colorado flag). Tour of Hotel is replayed during film’s last scenes in reverse, kitchen, maze, quarters, gold ballroom.  Sequences are even reversed ie: while describing maze, the party is actually walking away from the maze, surreal but not enough to awaken an audience into questioning storytelling.  Establishing shot of Colorado lounge showcases the group’s exit from the right elevator doors, the first time we see the doors post-blood vision and the only use of the elevator for ascension ever shown.  Later we will see this room has other elevator-masks.  An American flag caps the room’s end, just below here, Jack will begin writing. On an opposing 45 degree plane from the elevator is the first visible Navajo rug, made of browns, animating the hotel’s décor into a symbol source (from Lobby's polished surface designs to the weaving the patterns are born inside). Wendy is dressed in rug’s same colors.  Wendy is centered throughout tracking. Colorado lounge is a pronounced symbolic battlefield. Vast Tudor chandeliers lord over flattened Navajo patterns in rugs. Much of the Amerindian symmetry is walked upon or used out of context. A man now walks down stairs with a rug, towards us, in opposition to the previous lobby scene. Movement creates overlays in window-distance, mid-ground and foreground imagery. At opposite position to establishing elevator is a scale differential: an impossibly large fireplace (humans can fit inside it) opposite Sitting Bull's portrait. This is a movement from colorful abstract wall art outside Ullman office, the current 'chief' to this black and white photograph of a chief, placed opposite this massive fireplace. Any transition to black and white photograph suggests death, like Jack's transition into his. Fireplace under staircase means the chimney opens also at stair's top, converting this staircase into an internal, well hidden temple structure. Sitting Bull is its honoree, in it's 'underworld.' The chimney's mirror is the elevator shaft across the lounge. The one they emerge from.



    Games room is beginning of the Overlook's game, a game of death the hotel plays with any active user. Here Danny's first real time hallucination occurs, this doorway appearance of the Grady girls. Games room sequencing is beginning of the Hotel’s alteration of time made visible through editing: watch closely, the girls, their establishing vision and their outfits will expand into other sequences. "My son has discovered the games room." A hint at The Discovery, HAL's conscious vessel from 2001, the quote also lets the audience know that this is a game spirits play. A suggestion that foreknowledge is a weapon that emerges from knowledge. Kubrick shows mirrors within shots: Danny travels through the shot to return to an opposite stance, like Jack's initial hotel lobby sequence. Danny throws red darts (in contrast/parallel to his dad, who hurls a tennis ball later at the initial Navajo blanket beyond Ullman's office) to target and in whip-pan, girls in blue penetrate this dimension, they are no longer relegated to faked past or future, they appear present, corporeal, escalating the Hotel’s intention with Danny. The Hotel is animating (call it from now on shining) the dead as invitation to Danny: it looks as real as you are. A poster above this pair continues their symmetry deeper.   In reverse to the Colorado Lounge with its United States flag at top, this is the games room with a Colorado state flag (made from Colorado tribe's visual forms). Both flag and dart board are target-shaped and are shown at right angles. The state flag is also obviously a sun object, as is the skiing poster left of the girls (a clever mirror). Kubrick condenses symbol, color and technology in one room; the phones (communication), the card tables, the skiing, the buffalo hunt, and the conversion of the Colorado Indian emblem to state flag are part of this game of conversion, a vast metaphoric glyph of a conquest game. Its mirror is Jack's ball toss, who parallels Danny by throwing his ball in the Colorado Lounge against an Indian form. They both agree to play a game, signing on after psychic discoveries; the Hotel's mirrors must be consciously navigated to survive now.



    Like separation of blood-red pouring and girls’ establish shot, the red darts play counterpart to the girls’ blue isolation. They are responses to Danny's assertiveness, depsite the images he's been shown as a warning, he's prodding the hotel to communicate, he's pricking it to play a game with him. As the instigator, he will activate a portal to Room 237 by turning its knob (and seeing the 'past,' again).  Phone booth mimics vidphone in 2001.  In effect we are at both films' stage of consciousness: remember Dr. Floyd communicates with his daughter, now there are two girls of similar ages communicating, in reverse they are replying to him. Danny’s face stares at the departing girls, and cuts to arriving Torrances, in corridor with wall pattern behind where we first met girls in corridor vision in Bathroom mirror.  The solid yellow baseboards and blue walls here extrude from that rear corridor, amazingly the girls' fabric pattern is now on these walls. A complex completion across time and edits, a Shining. These subtle shifts cannot all be explained here, this guide excerpt is roughly half of the notes, but like Ullman taking lobby column's colors, and these girls' fabric extending on foreground wall in a future within the film, the upcoming is littered with hundreds of planned transferences. These keys are subtle and manipulative in an unconscious way (it makes the film riveting without knowing why).

    Look below and see the EXIT sign background right. This would imply a corridor is there and a staircase. Once we enter the bathroom of their apartment, and are shown the window in the bathoom (and then later we see Danny exit an entirely flat exterior wall) this corridor and implied exit are false in physical space. We have been fooled without seeing it exactly: unconsciously we can tell the entire Hotel's design is false. Deformities in spatial logic are continuous.

    Grown twins, tall, fair haired women, walk towards the blue floral wall pattern and Jack stares at them, duplicating Danny’s last act of seeing other near twins. They are seeing twins at differing time scales. Oval image above bed duplicates at final bed in 2001: A Space Odyssey and is a portal to the opening shot a few minutes ago (lake with island).  Kubrick probes the rooms until the bathroom to ensure we are aware of this layout logic.


     

    Bathroom is white and black and is terminus of this sequence as well as at film's climax, again a colorfield movement towards the photographs' black and white state.

    Both are followed by maze sequences.


    Introduction to Overlook's hedge-maze is begun with party walking away from it, the maze is capped by pyramids. They encounter red snocat, first blood red object featured centrally after elevator expulsion. The snocat's form is dissolved towards a right angled (to it) love seat at entrance to Gold Ballroom, which it turns out has much blood red furniture. Entrance to maze is capped by the continually reappearing half-circle. The eye-form of the poster and elevator dial.



    “I found him outside looking for you”  Danny seeks. Susie, a redhead, like the Doctor, also intervenes with Danny. “Did you get tired of bombing the universe?”  Another reference to Danny’s origin as 2001’s Starchild - final act unseen in 2001's script was the simultaneous destruction of the Earth's orbiting nuclear weapons. His jacket reads Flyers as a hint to his conscious duality, Tony's "eagle-spirit journey" that opens the film. Halloran is met in Gold Ballroom. Original goals of American conquest: passage to orient and gold.  Halloran's outfit is highly contrasted.  Staff met in Ballroom are near parodies of colonial battlefield, Halloran is an apparent Uncle Tom (it is his performance mask) and Grady is stodgy butler persona: they are cartoon characters (Scatman Crothers has voiced Disney characters).



     Watch Kubrick employ, like Ullman's office and his singles of Ullman and Jack, two framings of the ballroom, left and right oriented. The ballroom is introduced through lateral tracking, a penetration into left-right mirror worlds. The eye-forms (poster/elevator etc) appear as half-domes above insets on the golden stage far in the back. Ceiling and rear wall gold forms mimic Ullman's office window, light fixtures and shelves. Consistently, we see both sides of the mirror, an interview, illustrated above, indicated by the ladder's toggling between Halloran's shoulders. Danny crosses this mirror from a right framing and joins them on left. The parallax lines the ceiling creates recalls the 'Beyond the Infinite' sequence of 2001. The ceiling also mimics Aztec/Mayan temple interior/exteriors combined with suspended Tudor crown chandeliers: the Sun God is not only worshipped, its glittering spectacle is rendered day and night. The tables are clearly moon-shapes (to achieve their color temperature in a predominantly yellow hued room is difficult), and showcase the moon descendant, unworshipped, support for alcohol and tobacco usage. On the floor carpet, one of three wall-to-wall patterns in the film, is the Mayan logoglyph k'an composed in Mesoamerican colors of pink, gold and brown: the pouring blood red separated. K'an (which means yellow), is simultaneously a logoglyph and a cosmogram of the sun. "An abstraction of the four directions, this equal-armed cross may be the most widely shared symbol in the ancient Americas. As an implicit cosmogram, the cross was commonly associated with the sun..." [Reading Maya Art, Stone & Zender 2011]. While this is a coded symbol in Mesoamerican cultures, the symbol has been found across globe and time in many prehistoric cultures as early scrawled notation (it also is considered an entopic image; other early entoptic symbols include bar, dot and tri-dot [see Brian Hayden for further details]), k'an is the first communicable representation of the sun in the Americas, here Kubrick links the Gold Ballroom to the Mayan symbol for yellow through its carpeting and serves up a critical flow of ideas. Completing cosmologies, the film now has North and Central (Meso) information coding systems: the Navajo (and Apache, Crow, Blackfoot) are societies without written representation, yet their signs and symbols still encoded narratives, and now the Aztec and Maya are illustrated, societies who encoded information into syllabaries of logograms, logoglyphs and ideograms, a leap of written language that bypasses the west and its Indo-European alphabetic systems entirely.  Dick Halloran enters and keeps an optically clear ladder (teepee form) on his shoulder with a man standing on it, first indication Halloran may possess unusual gifts.

    The k'an symbol. Paradoxical that the day is celebrated in a room missing sunlight. The day, signified by k'an, is walked upon, the yellow sun's symbol broadcasts up from an underworld. The room's an up-down mirror of the outside, thematically linking time, daylight and false sunlight which are in constant interplay inside The Overlook. At its separations, INTERVIEW, CLOSING DAY, TUESDAY, 4pm, The Shining itself contracts in time spans, ending in the fraction of a second on a date that acts as the counterpoint to earlier looser framings; at film's beginning we view an infinity of time (the landscape's Interview). Mayan time expands from a centerpoint of creation, as the future expands so does the past. Western time leapfrogs over pivots: creation to birth to death. Non-linear or Continuum vs. Linear: the horror here is becoming trapped into a millisecond, into a flash at the end of the film before the film has begun, a nightmarish western time freeze.

    Gold Ballroom: there is a crucial play on words here, the yellow tennis ball will be the only ball we see consistently. Once properly decoded visually, this set is an inverted ballcourt (the ceiling) with a repeating sun image on the floor (the sky now below).  This ritual-game was the central practice in Mesoamerican societies, combining warfare, sun worship and sacrifice in an effort to assure the sun's movement and reappearance. The conquest of the Americas included the discovery and industrialization of rubber, witnessed first by Cortes through this spiritual game of human-sun interaction (and then harvested madly through the 18th, 19th and part of the 20th century - see the diaries of Roger Casement). The yellow tennis ball is, in effect, proof of colonization, a supreme compaction of sun-worshipping/ballgame played in Mesoamerican societies until the 1600's.  The ball that Jack throws remains a sun-object that has been conquered and absorbed into English game codes and now returns to the hotel as an ingenious prompt. It is a tease the spirits use, the Games Room expanded into every room.

    Tour of kitchen is like their separate learning of the maze later on. It shows Wendy how to use the hotel, she uses its portalling abilities consciously or unconsciously.  Jack never enters the kitchen except unconsciously, dragged by Wendy. He also never leaves the Hotel until film's end.  Kubrick elevates continuity tricks here into a form of phenomenology. The film is littered with perhaps hundreds of changed orientations of props, directions, entrances.  Look closely when watching, Halloran opens a door to the freezer on one side of this hallway and they exit on the opposite side. Notice the shift in door orientation entrance to exit. Kubrick is proving the hotel is a shifting corporeal engine, at times the doorways have no obvious logic, they are portals. The kitchen itself has illogical openings across the entire hotel. During the film's climax, Kubrick probes other accessways: Wendy will leave the lobby area, enter a red-mask of the hotel (the doorway to the kitchen, not an elevator) behind the Ullman office and will reappear a few seconds later across it in a darkened, cobwebbed version of the lobby. The final, key shift occurs during this lobby-split: the mirror entrance to the maze, which was first shown in daylight 90 degrees away, aimed away from the hotel, at film's end it now faces the hotel (Kubrick shows you a right pan to it).  Danny has properly perceived the maze's final opening, by studying both outer mirror and inner, his disoriented father is lured here, to an entrance to the maze only Danny seems to be aware of.  Wendy's moments later discovery of the lobby moonlit and cobwebbed is, like the alternate maze entrance, the Hotel's mirror alternate state.




    Frozen meat suggests this is another roomful of red, yet frost covers it with white. Containment of death that Jack will die in outside. Monochromatic like the B&W images.



    In dry storage room, zoom reveals Halloran mirrored with Calumet baking powder. It appears both on his left and ours at right angles. Yellows, oranges and greens counterpoint frozen monochrome hell of frozen storage. Music begins cue that shining is occurring and it seems to be the result of the visual mirorring between Halloran and the only modernized Indian 'cartoon,' an unanimated archetype color image of a Native American just behind him. Calumet was the Iroquois's peace/war pipe that became a contract between French and tribe later dismantled by U.S. Government’s evolving policies (despite the contract's acceptance into treaties). Jack will be imprisoned here, a step-away from the frozen mirror he ends inside, mirrored in time, the kitchen's maze is mirrored against the one outside.  Danny’s favorite food is french fries and ketchup, yellow and red. Dry goods storage is asymmetrical, the mausoleum-like cold storage for frozen meat is symmetric.



    Brilliant sequence. The group's departure leaving Danny and Halloran behind suggests Halloran can still hear them as they depart out of earshot: they never leave his head's 'aura' in dissolve. Both parties are reversed from one another, ending with a dissolve of the group farther away into Halloran's head who begins with "do you know how I knew your name?" as Kubrick has just slyly explained visually how he does. Subtle, distant voices are heard throughout this scene.

    Arrow forms are now aimed downwards, the knives on the background's column pointing towards the underworld. Favorite flavor is chocolate. Inadvertant result of America’s conquest is west's discovery of cocoa (Aztec/Cortes). Halloran is revealed as protector, first testing validity of Tony’s advice, then discoursing about the Overlook, discouraging his curiosity. Danny has eaten from a silver cup-chalice that he surrounds with his arms. Both use hands posed in signalling manner of discussion, initial one indicates collective prayer, they mutate per shot, defying continuity.  Danny is a seer, like Halloran. Objects and head shine here.  Shine in Danny’s chalice and Halloran’s head and their shapes intentionally similar.

     

    continues