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fuckery
  • 31320.2226

    Archers were considerably the most dangerous members of any army since they brought death by air and distance. Archers utilized their middle fingers and if captured, their prize digit was removed as penalty and warning. On battlefields under preparation for skirmishing, archers would begin by displaying their still existing finger to the enemy as a taunt. Come and get this.

  • 31320.1031

    Envelopes containing white powder arrived at The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday morning, addressed to top editors and executives of the newspaper, stirring recollections of the anthrax mailings of 2001, and prompting the evacuation of some of the paper’s offices in Lower Manhattan.

    The New York Police Department was on the scene by midday, but officials said it would be some time before the powder was identified.

    “There were at least a dozen envelopes that we know of,” a spokesman for the paper, Robert H. Christie, said. He would not say to whom the envelopes were addressed, identifying the recipients only as executives.

    But Journal employees, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the matter, said that at least some envelopes were sent to Robert Thomson, the managing editor; Paul Gigot, the editorial page editor; and Les Hinton, the chief executive of Dow Jones & Company, the unit of News Corporation that owns the paper.

    The employees said that the executives’ assistants opened some of the envelopes.

    In the World Financial Center tower that houses The Journal, the 11th floor, where executive offices and the editorial board are housed, and the 9th floor, were evacuated. Employees were being prohibited from going to the newsrooms on the 10th and 12th floors, but as of 12:30 p.m. those had not been evacuated.

  • 31318.0758

  • 31318.0735
    Musician Canned for Focus on Wrong Organ
    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Filed at 5:20 p.m. ET

    NEW FRANKEN, Wis. (AP) -- A Catholic priest has removed his church's organist and choir director from her duties saying her sale of sex toys was not ''consistent with Church teachings.''

    Linette Servais, 50, played the organ and sung with the choir for 35 years. Much of her work as choir director and organist was done without pay. When her parish priest asked to meet with her, she thought it was to say thank you.

    Instead, she was told to quit her sales job with company known as Pure Romance or she would lose her position in the church.

    Pure Romance in Loveland, Ohio, is a $60 million per year business that sells spa products and sex toys at homes parties attended by women. It has 15,000 consultants like Servais.

    She said her decision was not hard: She began working with Pure Romance after a brain tumor and treatment left her sexually dysfunctional. The job allows her to help other women who have similar problems.

    ''After I got over the initial shock, I prayed over this a long time,'' she said. ''I feel that Pure Romance is my ministry.''

    The Rev. Dean Dombroski felt differently, removing her from the choir loft just before Thanksgiving and gradually taking away other church duties. Servais can no longer take pictures during First Communion services or lead the committee planning St. Joseph's annual late-summer picnic.

    Dombroski said he couldn't discuss the situation because it involves personnel. But in a letter to his rural congregation, he wrote: ''Linette is a consultant for a firm which sells products of a sexual nature that are not consistent with Church teachings. Because parish leaders are expected to model the teaching of our faith ... she could stay on as the choir director/organist or she could continue to be a consultant but she could not do both.''

    Servais responded with her own three-page letter to church members, saying she felt compelled to help other women, especially those suffering from problems caused by cancer.

    Many choir members quit in support, she said, and some have gathered at her home on occasional Thursdays to sing hymns.

    ''Father Dean made it sound so sinful,'' she said. ''There is so much more to this business than toys.''
  • 31315.0713

  • 31315.0700

  • 31312.2223

    Craig Baldwin, whose 90's supercult flick Tribulation 99, a kind of fever-parody of conspiracy paradoxes, has a new emission called Mock up on MU, which has to be seen to believed. He spans the globe searching for applicable sentient fears. Now playing in NY at anthology filmarchive.

  • 31312.1249

  • 31312.0000
  • 31311.1942

    Filed at 10:10 p.m. ET

    MILTON, Fla. (AP) -- An Indiana businessman whose financial management companies were under investigation apparently made a fake distress call, bailed out of his small plane and then let it crash in a Florida panhandle swamp.

    Authorities searched Monday for Marcus Schrenker after he made the distress call and apparently secretly parachuted to safety near Birmingham, Ala. His single-engine plane continued flying on autopilot and eventually crashed late Sunday more than 200 miles away in a swampy area of the Florida Panhandle.

    In the weeks before the crash, Schrenker's life was spiraling downward: He lost a half-million-dollar judgment against one of his companies when he skipped a court hearing. His wife filed for divorce, and investigators probing his businesses for possible securities violations searched his home and office.

    Authorities believe Schrenker was last seen Monday morning in Childersburg, Ala., just south of Birmingham, when a man using his Indiana driver's license told police that he'd been in a canoe accident. He was wet only from the knees down and had what appeared to be goggles made for flying.

    The investigation into the crash began Sunday night, when Schrenker's single-engine Piper Malibu crashed in a swampy area of north Florida.

    The plane was en route from Anderson, Ind., to the Florida Panhandle city of Destin when Schrenker reported turbulence. He said the windshield had imploded and he was bleeding profusely, according to the sheriff's office in Santa Rosa County, where the plane crashed.

    After he stopped responding to air traffic controllers, military jets tried to intercept the plane. They noticed the door was open and the cockpit was dark and continued to follow it until it crashed in a bayou surrounded by homes.

    But when investigators found the plane, its door was ajar and the wreckage showed no signs of blood or the blown windshield. The sheriff's office said Schrenker appeared to have intentionally abandoned his plane.

    Bill and Debbie Timbie, whose house is less than 100 yards from where the plane crashed, were home Sunday night when they heard the jets flying overhead. Bill Timbie gave rescuers looking for the downed plane a ride through the swamp in his canoe.

    ''Now, after you think about it, it could have been real bad, it could have taken out two or three houses,'' he said Monday.

    The case grew stranger Monday morning, when the man with Schrenker's license told police in Childersburg -- about 225 miles from where the plane crashed -- that he'd been in a canoe accident with friends.

    The officers, unaware of the plane crash, took him to a hotel. He was gone by the time they returned. They learned he had paid for his room in cash before putting on a black cap and running into the woods next to the hotel.

    Authorities in Indiana have said little about the nature of the investigation into Schrenker's businesses -- Heritage Wealth Management Inc., Heritage Insurance Services Inc. and Icon Wealth Management -- wealth management companies that provide financial advice. Jim Gavin, a spokesman for Indiana's secretary of state, said investigators are looking at possible securities violations, and officers who searched Schrenker's home Dec. 31 were looking for laptops, computers, notes, photos and other documents related to those companies.

    Court records show his wife, Michelle, filed for divorce a day before the searches.

    Gavin said the Indiana Securities Division obtained a temporary restraining order Monday freezing the personal assets of Marcus Schrenker and Michelle Schrenker and the assets of the three companies.

    On Friday, two days before the crash, a federal judge in Maryland issued a $533,500 judgment against Heritage Wealth Management Inc., and in favor of OM Financial Life Insurance Co. The OM lawsuit contended that Heritage Wealth Management should have returned more than $230,000 in commissions because there were problems with insurance or annuity plans Heritage had sold.

    Schrenker is an accomplished pilot with a background in aerobatics, said Ron Smith, an interim manager at Anderson Municipal Airport. He usually flies out of the airport about once a week, making regular trips to Florida, he said.

    ''He's an outstanding pilot, from what I understand,'' Smith said. ''If he can fly aerobatics and a Meridian, you've got to be pretty decent.''

    Those skills made Tom Britt, who edits a newsletter for the affluent Indianapolis suburb in which Schrenker lives, suspicious of the circumstances surrounding the crash when he heard about it from a local reporter. Britt knew about the securities investigation.

    ''I said, 'Do they have his body? Call the police and tell them to pull the teeth out of it, because if there's a body in that plane, I guarantee that's not Marc Schrenker,''' Britt said.

    Residents jokingly call the community where Schrenker lives, which overlooks a reservoir, ''Cocktail Cove'' because the boaters plying its waters often have a mixed drink in hand.

    The serene setting belies what Britt described as a sometimes tense relationship between Schrenker and his neighors. He said Schrenker has two sides -- one very cordial and generous, the other threatening and litigious -- and that many in the neighborhood had run-ins with him and ''didn't care too much for him.''