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ethnicity
  • 312115.2012

    The World Directory of Minorities http://www.faqs.org/minorities/index.html

  • 31287.1557

    How Kubrick remains viral, in his least understood film, the central masked ritual is linked directly to wealth lineage.

    R.N.C. Spends Thousands on Jets, Limos and Clubs
    By JEFF ZELENY and BERNIE BECKER

    WASHINGTON — The Republican National Committee opened an investigation on Monday into why money from donors was paid to reimburse a $2,000 tab at a risqué California nightclub earlier this year, party officials said.

    “It was obviously improper — for more than one reason,” said Doug Heye, a spokesman for the party said. “It was not a sanctioned RNC activity. It was improper because of the venue.”

    As Republicans attempt to win back control of the House and Senate in this midterm election year, several party officials and contributors have raised questions about the financial disparities between the Democratic and the Republican parties. Republican officials opened a review of their spending after the nightclub expense was discovered by reporters for The Daily Caller, an online publication in Washington.

    The Republican National Committee spent about $30,000 in February on private airplanes and limousines. But those charges were overshadowed by the $1,946.25 charge at Voyeur West Hollywood, which was described by The Los Angeles Times last year as a “high-end nightclub” with an interior “reminiscent of the masked orgy scene” from the movie “Eyes Wide Shut.”

    Mr. Heye, the party spokesman, said that the Republican chairman, Michael S. Steele, was not responsible for the charges. He said the reimbursement was made to a “non-committee staffer,” whom he identified as Erik Brown of Orange, Calif., a political consultant. Mr. Heye said the money would be paid back to the Republican National Committee.

    “The chairman was never at the location in question, he had no knowledge of the expenditure, nor does he find the use of committee funds at such a location acceptable at all,” Mr. Heye said in a statement.

    Meanwhile, the F.E.C. filings show some $17,500 spent on private jets in February, in addition to more than $12,500 on limousines, which could add to the perception that Mr. Steele has expensive tastes. The filings also list several charges of well over $1,000 at hotels in Washington and elsewhere.

    The Democratic National Committee seized on the report Monday.

    “If limos, chartered aircraft and sex clubs are where they think their donor’s money should be spent — who are we to judge?” asked Brad Woodhouse, a spokesman for the Democratic National Committee. “But, this controversy shouldn’t give voters much confidence in Republicans when they say they want to be put back in charge of federal spending — not that their performance the last time they were in charge would have engendered any confidence in the first place.”

    Correction: March 30, 2010

    An earlier version of this article incorrectly referred to a movie with a “masked orgy scene.” The movie is “Eyes Wide Shut,” not “Closer.”
     

  • 31281.1427

    "The Indians be of lustful, heathfull bodies, not experimentally knowing the Catalogue of those health wasting diseases which are incident to other Countries, as Feavers, Pleuresies, Callentures, Agues, Obstructions, Consumptions, Subsumigations, Convulsions, Apoplexies, Dropsies, Gouts, Stones, Toothaches, Pox, Measles or the like but spinny out the threed of their days to a faire length, numbering three score, four score, some a hundred yeares, before the world's universall summoner cite them to the craving Grave. William Wood The New England Prospect

    "Sir Jeffrey Amherst, commander-in-chief of the British forces...wrote in the postscript of a letter to Bouquet the suggestion that smallpox be sent among the disaffected tribes. Bouquet replied, also in a postscript, "I will try to innoculate the[m]...with some blankets that may fall into their hands, and take care not to get the disease myself."...To Bouquet's postscript Amherst replied, "You will do well to try to innoculate the Indians by means of blankets as well as to try every other method that can serve to extirpate this exorable race." On June 24, Captain Ecuyer, of the Royal Americans, noted in his journal: "Out of our regard for them (i.e.,two Indian chiefs) we gave them two blankets and a handkerchief out of the smallpox hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect." Wagner Stearn and Allen Stearn The Effect of Smallpox on the Destiny of the Amerindian

    "...smallpox from 1617 to 1619 'wiped out nine-tenths of the Indian population along the Massachusetts coast.' (Hopkins 1983)  The English pilgrims landed the Mayflower at Cape Cod in 1620. Then, not finding that area to their liking, they left and sailed to Plymouth. As a result of the epidemic that had preceded them, 'Miles Standish and his companions found only 'a few straggling inhabitants, burial places, empty wigwams, and some skeletons when they arrived at Plymouth' (Hopkins, 1983). This was not to their dissapointment: the pilgrims noted, "Thus farre hath the good hand of God favored our beginnings...In sweeping away the great multitudes of the natives...a little more before we went thither, that he might make room for us there" (quoted in Williams, 1909) Russell Thornton American Indian Holocaust and Survival

     

  • 31280.1016

    The most under-reported filmmaker is innovator-animator Ralph Bakshi, whose War Wizards came out in 1977 with a small voice part for a little known actor named Mark Hamill. Worried that two out-there 'war' titled films from 20th Century Fox would confuse the market, Star Wars' George Lucas appealed to Bakshi and asked him to rename his film Wizards. Bakshi agreed. Both Bakshi and Lucas had appealed to the Fox board for 11th hour overbudget requests and both had been turned down. Lucas would make do, shooting a few inserts in a restaged cantina and taking zoom footage of the landspeeder out in the Mojave and end up with paydirt. Forced to simplify his film's ending carnage, Bakshi slid in some newsreel footage and fictional live action war film sequences he rotoscoped and distorted (battle smoke gets mirrored) and caused one unintentional parallel: stormtroopers appear in Wizards as their Nazi selves and in Star Wars as a naming that spanned a galaxy. Wizards was a minor hit for Fox. His least seen film was intended to be his arrival into broad, acceptable satire. Coonskin was a marriage between exploitation and dislocation that veered between live action and animated parallels: it drifts by juxtapositioning acted archetypes with drawn ones. Scatman Crothers and Barry White headline. This two-fisted genre manner isn't Bakshi's invention but he did innovate it so radically that Coonskin was immediately pounced upon by Al Sharpton's CORE. Coonskin became a victim of political correctiveness and was quickly disowned by its financier Paramount and sold to a low-level releasing company who released it as Street Fight. This long forgotten masterpiece was never actually seen by Sharpton and his crew, they were merely protesting the film's appearance. Notice Bakshi's subtle color usage-as-commentary in the title sequence image: Scatman Crothers's skintone and background are shown as brown hues while the titles are markedly black. In a film about the black ethnic condition and its myths, the only thing black you actually see are letters.

    The most successful anti-Disney double feature is still Fritz the Cat and Heavy Traffic. Bakshi is so pivotal, Peter Jackson denied he had ever seen his version of Lord of the Rings that emerged in 1978, (when Jackson was 17), and he later bizarrely recanted. In a way, Jackson's retelling was predicted by Bakshi's unfinished version, which was condensing Tolkien denser than Jackson's windy trilogy with three books into two films.

  • 31274.1323

  • 31273.1246

    This copiously illustrated link is a composite of this excellent book on-line. Very complex hybrids between visuals: propaganda, political art, manifestoes, and bland infographics. The first image is a satire of Manchu domestic/foreign policies in one-mask. Note the use of anthropomorphized mice in the final image.

  • 31272.0004

  • 31243.1532

     

    http://books.google.com/books?id=JeiEprPiGvAC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_v2_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q=&f=false

    http://books.google.com/books?id=XOgNAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_similarbooks_r&cad=2#v=onepage&q=&f=false

  • 31232.1415

    Resolutely simplistic, seemingly complex, Hurt Locker bears the mark of all mediocre films, most of its tensions disappear on second viewing, some of them dissolve even during their first. Its logic messy and unconvincing, Bigelow has many choices but seems to milk any distortion she can while sacrificing intelligent sequencing. Early on a butcher detonates an IED after the targeted technician has come closest to the killzone, he's already on his way out when it detonates, the purpose here is to array the tensions in layers yet it destroys the pure logic of the bomb's purpose. Bigelow couches everything, it's her first pop-out, the butcher holds his cellphone-bomb-remote artificially and in plain sight, needlessly calling attention from the support troops. Meetings between unknowns are milked for every second of tension possible, 'you guys are wired tight' is the understatement of the film, James' taxi encounter seems to go on for years, the initial seconds of the encounter with mercenary Brits are elongated like a blind date intro.  'Improvs' like the use of a smoke flare to reduce visibility on a tight street are met with hysteria from Sanborn, the film seems to create drama out of operatic fear. You'd wonder if the bomb unit had any sense of cool. The support team loses its lunch at every possible turn, grating audience nerves needlessly, and surely Iraq vets in the audience leave the film rolling eyes: who are these whiners?  Without the perceptive distortions we share with Renner's central character, all cheap gotchas that usually are tools of the horror film, the film is merely a stylized, largely static war drama with a component fate: the tension of defusing catastrophic bombs. Interspersed between the wooden Green Zone/base therapy-'letting steam-off' scenery is the paranoia of cultural confusion and divided languages. The technical nightmares of urban warfare in a city only temporarily conquered are never fully realized though: the plot has to depart the city to duel with ultra-long lenses where its one Iraq-conflict-signature-jarhead-moment, the sniper exchange and outcome, falls this side of flat. She can't decide if the film is a document of what seems real or is it all too surreal?  For all the supposed technical charms of Bigelow's macho bravo eye, it still feels more transvestite than transcendant. Moments like the boy's reappearance and the confused home invasion have contrivances that weigh sentimental rather than paint the film with radical shifts in wartime paradox. Generals, medics, buddies, even cameos like Fiennes and Pearce are modulated into a gruff anyspeak.  Its mediocrity rises full pitch as the film ends with his child's jack-in-the-box routine, a metaphor so leaden, Bigelow may as well be saying: do you get it? The way she displays data is glaring, his box of denatured devices, what is being left in the transitions, nothing. Fear? Do we really obtain a sense of the streets?  Culture is still awaiting this war's watershed flick: the Deer Hunter-Apocalypse Now-Full Metal Jacket lens. Where plot is only a decoy to obtain the visual epic.

  • 31227.2039