• warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/includes/theme.inc on line 171.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
314309.0740

You can find mention in fairly old books of toys made out of water-filled

animal bladders

. Bladders apparently expand quite a bit (I haven't tried.) Unfortunately I can't give you names of these books since that's about all I've been told by the various librarians I talked to. As far as more modern books, there is a reference to a ball of this type in one of the

Little House on the Prairie

books. I think it was "Little House in the Big Woods" near the beginning of the book. If you really want to do the research I suggest you look through literature written during the Renaissance in Europe. Merlin has found references indicating that balloon sculpting dates back at least as far as the Aztecs.

Prior to skinnies being made out of rubber they may have been constructed out of intestine; presumably different animals would provide different diameters. The following is offered as supporting evidence;

 

Swiss Family Robinson (1813) "Papa," said Jack, "can't you make me a balloon with this piece of whale entrail?"

Moby Dick (1851) [re sperm whales] "Gasses are generated in him; he swells to a prodigious magnitude; becomes a sort of animal balloon."

In the "olden days", especially in the European regions, jesters and troubadors (pardon my spelling) were said to sometimes inflate the entrails of recently butchered animals and "entertain" with them. The bladders, intestines, and sometimes the stomach, were strong enough that, despite their thinness, they could be manipulated into amusing shapes.

            Great Balloons! The Complete Book of Balloon Sculpting' by Jean Merlin, Kaufman and Greenberg, 1994

 

"...the Aztecs were the very first people in history to make animals out of the bowels of cats to be presented to the gods as a sacrifice. The bowels were carefully cleaned, turned inside out, and sewn with a special vegetable thread whose main property was that it stuck to itself when left to dry in the sun, and this produced an almost airtight seal.

The bowels were then twisted and air was blown into them after each twist. When a particularly contagious disease exterminated most of the cats, they used the bowels of the corpses, and when these grew in short supply, human sacrifices were offered to the gods for the sole purpose of obtaining fresh bowels.

As Jacques Dupion Grouchard remarked in his beautiful book, The Mayannaise Connection, the simple making of one animal required several days. And there were only two models: the dog and a kind of donkey.

Once they had been made, the animals were carried (with great ceremony) to the top of the Aztec pyramid, where they were burned in praise of the sun.

Strangely enough, inside the pyramid of Mikerinos, one can see drawings engraved in stone representing camels made of a series of bubbles, about which Champollion says in his book The Rosetta Stone and Other Sidejobs: '...one wonders whether these figures of camels do not represent artifacts that were made out of camel's guts."

But it is only with the advent of rubber that the Mexicans began manufacturing balloons intended for modeling. The most famous among them was Senor Carlos, who was the first to come over to Europe to perform his balloon sculpting act at the famous Lido de Paris."

Login to post comments
Comments