• warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/includes/theme.inc on line 171.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
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311256.0556

The return of the director after his 1941 Rube Goldberg adventure-comedy, Raiders is the first collaboration between mythologist Lucas and pagan physical-gag inventor Spielberg. Though the film is clearly Spielberg's masterpiece (one of many), Lucas keeps his eye on the ending maelstrom while Spielberg is left to rule the kinetic mayhem that overtakes nearly every scene. Raiders is a merge of Republic serials (Zorro) and Uncle Scrooge's colonialist misdaventures looking for buried gold (see Carl Barks) lensed by the British golden-age of cinema, the brilliant exposer of inky blacks and dappled or raw sunlight, Douglas Slocombe. All these minds pressed into service by Lucas & Spielberg come up with some pretty inventive differentials; notice Indy taking very seriously the sand he scatters to balance the opening idol's weight (Spielberg overlaps the sand as it spills before the idol), while the trio of baddies laugh-off their sand fiiled ark. Paul Freeman's Belloq tosses sand coarsely to contrast Indy's reverential opening gesture. Look closer and you can see how similar the opening and ending are: the Nazis' open-air electrocution is a supernatural version of the underground arrow spitting idol-chamber: altars, ceremonial approaches, even faces that bring death, with Indy escaping both. Linking them all is a brilliant lesson in imagery that follows Indy's intro to archeology class: agents also getting their lesson are shown the ark's graphic ("there's a picture of it") which cuts directly into first, a bright, stained-glass window (shot in a British Freemasonry hall) and then to the staff of Ra's blackboard illustration, all three beam's sources oriented in the same position in the frame left.

Notice below, Tanis and Washington D.C. are cleverly linked, both 'Egyptian' cities will be associated with stealing and hiding the Hebrew god's ark.

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