• warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/includes/theme.inc on line 171.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h01/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
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312252.0702

The news that the key English language newspaper will cease to print on paper in the near future has some agog, but the terminal state of daily print has been a long time coming. One factor is the future revenue model's current shortcomings: 1) not enough cheap (or free) tablet devices, 2) little chance of them 'universalizing' their content inputs and 3) an audience and industry that doesn't know the benefits of tying their content choices to minute pay-streams (3¢ to license a news source for a day). The other, more complex issue, is the viability of English as a record of our global thinking. Can our species evolve using such an unconsciously varied tool?  English may be the language that won 2/3's of North America, but its evergrowing dictionary is accompanied by devolutionary devices like homonyms, lexemes, varied grammatical nuances, and pronunciation patterns and accents hidden from its users who rely entirely on a written form. English may be the poet's dream but it's the structuralists nightmare. As an unconscious self-parody of both the newspaper's and the language's potential coming end, the NY Times focuses its readers into the very properties that make the language inexcusably porous and vague: word-games, puzzles and multiple columns that deal with the inefficiencies of the King's toungue, even articles on the vagaries of Wikipedia's never ending edits (mostly due to word meaning, not factual aggression). Study your language, it may be killing you. Switching languages may seem like a difficult task, but it is no different than adapting to new technologies with the proper prompting. Long rest English.

www.huffingtonpost.com/henry-blodget/sulzberger-concedes-we-wi_b_710778.html

schott.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/09/10/daily-lexeme-snaste/

bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/09/09/the-backstory-of-wikipedias-take-on-the-iraq-war/

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